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The Value of the American Community Survey: Smart Government, Competitive Businesses, and Informed Citizens

The American Community Survey (ACS) is the largest continuous household survey in the United States, providing a wealth of information about the economic, social, and demographic characteristics of persons, as well as housing characteristics. One goal of the ACS is to serve as a cost-effective vehicle for collecting information required by law, regulation, or executive order on behalf of Federal agencies or at the direction of Congress. In conducting the ACS, the U.S. Census Bureau leverages its existing infrastructure and data collection expertise on behalf of the Federal Government.

An Update on Temporary Help in Manufacturing

The temporary help services industry has bounced back from the recession and continues to grow.  Newly available data are enabling the Economics and Statistics Administration (ESA) to re-examine this important industry and update a report on the temp industry that we published last year.1 Although we don't know exactly how many temporary workers actually work in the manufacturing sector, we estimate that temps fill somewhere in the range of 8 to 10 percent of all jobs in production occupations in the manufacturing sector.2 Because temps are not counted as manu

Supply Chain Innovation: Strengthening America’s Small Manufacturers

Small firms play an increasingly important role in U.S. manufacturing, and now account for almost half of America's manufacturing employment.

Dense networks of these small manufacturers are vital to the process of taking a product from concept to market, and the exchange of manufacturing know-how across suppliers is essential for the diffusion of the new products and innovative processes that give U.S. manufacturing its cutting edge. 

The Importance of Data Occupations in the U.S. Economy

The growing importance of data in the economy is hard to dispute. But what does this mean for workers and jobs? A lot, as it turns out: higher paying (over $40/hour), faster growing jobs.

In this report we identify occupations where data analysis and processing are central to the work performed and measure the size of employment and earnings in these occupations, as well as in the industries that have the highest concentration of these data occupations.

What is Made In America?

Made In America Industry CollageExecutive Summary - Accurately determining how much of our economy's total production is American-made can be a daunting task. However, data from the Commerce Department's U.S. Census Bureau and the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) can help shed light on the dollar value of what America produces, and what percentage of the dollar value of an industry's output that is considered domestic.

Competition Among U.S. Broadband Service Providers

More than one quarter of American homes have not adopted Internet service, many citing cost as their primary reason. Since market competition can significantly affect consumer prices, we set out to ask: how many Internet service providers (ISPs) are available to consumers at different levels of download speeds?

The Economic Benefits of Reducing Supplier Working Capital Costs

Large firms depend on suppliers for most of their value-added. Many suppliers are small and their viability is closely tied to their ability to access and manage working capital. The Obama Administration’s SupplierPay initiative was developed to bring companies together to address the working capital challenges facing small firms. This paper explores the potential economic benefits -- throughout the supply chain -- of reducing suppliers’ working capital costs.

Temporary Help in Manufacturing

The temporary help services industry has bounced back from the recession and continues to grow. According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Current Employment Statistics (CES) program, the temporary help industry only accounts for 2 percent of all employment in the U.S. economy (as of July 2014), but accounts for 11 percent of all the jobs created since the end of the recession. Growth has continued steadily in 2014, with 107,100 temp jobs added during the first seven months of the year.

Fostering Innovation, Creating Jobs, Driving Better Decisions: The Value of Government Data

Executive Summary

Everyone is talking about the importance of data to our society as data improves all of our decisions: those we make as individuals, as businesses, as governments.

Government has been in the data business for quite some time, going back to the first Decennial Census in 1790. Since then, the U.S. Government has played a key role in providing valuable data to our country.

The Systemically Important Auto Supply Chain

NABE Industry Conference, May 29, 2014 - Keynote address "The Systemically Important Auto Supply Chain" delivered by Dr. Susan Helper, Chief Economist, The Department of Commerce.

Manufacturing Since the Great Recession

Executive Summary

The U.S. manufacturing sector has turned a corner. For the first time in over 10 years, output and employment are growing steadily. Manufacturing output has grown 38 percent since the end of the recession, and the sector accounts for 19 percent of the rise in real gross domestic product (GDP) since then. Through May, the sector has added 646,000 jobs, and manufacturers are actively recruiting to fill another 243,000 positions.[1]

Winning Business Investment in the United States

The United States is an increasingly attractive location for business investment from global companies. In AT Kearney’s 2013 FDI Confidence Index, the United States surged past countries like China, Brazil and India to become the country with the top FDI prospects globally, as ranked by 302 companies representing 28 countries and multiple industry sectors.[i] This marks the first time that the US occupied the #1 spot in the survey since 2001.[ii] In a survey of U.S.

Digital Economy and Cross-Border Trade: The Value of Digitally-Deliverable Services

The digital, or Internet, economy has transformed many aspects of our lives over the past two decades. How we communicate, entertain ourselves, make decisions, and do business continues to evolve as the digital economy grows in size and importance. Given this transformation, it is becoming even more important for policymakers to consider how the Internet affects our lives and the economy as a whole.

Exploring the Digital Nation: America's Emerging Online Experience

This report, based on data from the Census Bureau’s July 2011 Current Population Survey (“CPS”) Computer and Internet Use Supplement, updates and substantially expands on the previous study in this series, Exploring the Digital Nation: Computer and Internet Use at Home, issued in 2011. For the first time in eight years, this study goes beyond new findings on computer and Internet adoption in the United States to also present data on Americans’ online activities – what Americans do once they connect to the Internet.

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